An Incredible Encounter

I thought I’d heard of everything until on Friday night my brother told me to hurry out into the garden with my camera because he had been clipping the garden hedge when suddenly a Sparrowhawk (Accipter nisus) lunged out of the sky and attempted to carry off his garden shears! My first reaction was he must be losing his marbles, but then, he said the sparrowhawk had dropped to the ground after making its attack, looking stunned. It was now watching him from the top of the fence! Surely he had to be wrong? But, incredibly, it was still there, and still watching him. I managed to get several photos!

I got close enough to see that the sparrowhawk was almost certainly a young male, quite a bit smaller than a female. About the size of a Collared Dove, but far more robust. I attempted to edge closer for a better shot but, annoyed by my presence, the sparrowhawk flew into a neighbouring garden. I went back into the house and my brother continued clipping the hedge, and then he suddenly came to the door and said “He’s back! He’s watching me!”

   Incredibly, the sparrowhawk was now perched on a neighbour’s house and was watching my brother working with his shears, possibly considering another attack. Clearly the sound of the shears was encouraging the hawk. I took several still photos and some video and edged closer as darkness approached. The sparrowhawk decided to fly off at that point. And if you doubt any of this please look at the video  I took, below, showing the hawk actually watching my brother at work. You will not be disappointed.

Still To See

It’s the last full week of August now and many people would think summer was drawing to an end, but there are still plenty of wonderful wild things to see in Wicklow. If you look in the streams right now you have a very good chance of seeing Brown (Sea) Trout parr (sub-adults) (Salmo trutta) in the crystal clear waters. In fact, there are loads of them and they are very handsomely marked and coloured:

Also, due to the very balmy winter, subsequent early spring, and the fairly consistent summer we’ve had this year, many birds have had more than one brood of youngters. It would seem some have had as many as three broods. Here is a Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) I saw feeding one of three fledglings which were moving through willow tree canopies with it.

Finally, keep an eye out for a lovely little bright red flower known as the Scarlet Pimpernel (Anagallis arvensis). This tiny flower opens and closes depending on the weather, and is famously used to predict coming weather as it will often open or close in advance of sun or rain, respectively. Most people will know the Scarlet Pimpernel as a swashbuckling hero of novels and films, but almost as many people are left wondering what a ‘pimpernel’ is exactly. Believe it or not it’s a very old Latin word for pepper – piperinella, which got modified over the centuries by the addition of an m. There is also a Bog Pimpernel and a Yellow Pimpernel, and, ridiculously, Scarlet Pimpernel can itself also be pink or royal blue in colour. However, it is mostly red in colour, as the name suggests. Anyhow, I personally feel a swashbucking hero going by the name ‘The Scarlet Pepper’ doesn’t really have the same ring to it, so long live Pimpernel!

Heritage Week

Tonight at midnight National Heritage Week starts and runs until Sunday, 27th August. There are events celebrating Irish heritage all over the country and Wicklow has many too. This year the emphasis is on my favourite subject, natural heritage. However, as usual every kind of heritage is covered. You can see a full list of events here: http://www.heritageweek.ie/

Even if you don’t attend any of the events, or if you attend all of them (not really possible) you can celebrate natural heritage in your own way. I’m starting by photographing moths tonight.

   Here are some interesting ones I’ve already found, and which you can see tonight too, as they’re very common. Firstly the beautiful Mother-of-Pearl moth (Pleuroptya ruralis), which I’ve written about recently. It really does look like its wings are made of mother-of-pearl as they have the same sort of shine as the inside of an oyster shell:

And here is a lovely moth called the Hebrew Character (Orthosia gothica) as it has a marking on its wings which look somewhat like a Hebrew letter. The caterpillars of these moths can commonly be found on lawns in spring, and sometimes even during winter months.