St. Patrick’s Day and the start of true Spring

Because the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Greystones yesterday was so spectacular, and large, and blessed by sunny weather, I opted to upload that video on its own, and devote a second video to my annual St. Patrick’s Day nature walk. This year’s was far less dramatic, but far more beautiful, although the weather did get interesting later in the day, with showers of freezing rain and hailstones. So here is the video, but read on after it too:

Whereas last year it snowed the day after St. Patrick’s Day, today something more welcome occurred – I found my first Tawny Mining Bee of the season, and it was a female, the earliest female of this species I’ve ever found. She appears at the end of the video too, but here’s a close-up shot of this very beautiful bee:

St. Patrick’s Day is traditionally held on the anniversary of St. Patrick’s death. However, in ancient times 17th March was a very important feast day, that of the god of fertility, Bacchus, aka Dionysius, marking the arrival of true Spring. Because astronomical spring in Ireland also marks the arrival of warmer spring weather. This coming Wednesday, 20th March, is the Equinox. At 9.58 in the evening the earth is exactly halfway on it’s journey around the Sun, and day and night are of equal length and the Sun rises directly in the east and sets directly in the west. From that day on, until the Summer Solstice in June, the days get progressively longer than the nights. Exciting.