Progenies of a Warm Summer

This year Wicklow was blessed by a very warm spring and summer. August has brought some heavy rain belts, most recently the remains of Hurricane Bertha, which passed across the island overnight, but all in all it has been a very good year. The most unusual thing I came across this year was a nest of Norwegian Wasps (Dolichovespula norvegica) which nested in a buddleia bush in my own garden. These wasps and the similar Tree Wasp look like the Common Wasp but make their nests only in trees and shrubs. It was my first time seeing them and they are considered a relatively new arrival in Ireland.  They can only be positively identified by the markings on their faces… and that isn’t easy to do but a camera makes it easier.

The nest of the Norwegian Wasps wound around the bracnhes of a butterfly bush, with some wasps perched on the outside.
The nest of the Norwegian Wasps wound around the bracnhes of a butterfly bush, with some wasps perched on the outside.

They soon got used to my approach, although were still in the habit of buzzing strangers who came near the gate. But in the last few weeks the wasp population has crashed across all species. Instead of wasps there are near identical hoverflies feeding on fallen fruit. But the butterflies are doing exceptionally well this year. Especially this beauty, the Small Tortoiseshell, which can be seen wherever there are butterfly bushes and warm walls and fences to bask on.

One of the most beautiful of our native butterflies, the Small Tortoiseshell is also long-lived and hibernates through the winter.This one pictured is feeding on mustard nectar.
One of the most beautiful of our native butterflies, the Small Tortoiseshell is also long-lived and hibernates through the winter.This one pictured is feeding on mustard nectar.

However, the damp conditions certainly suit some creatures, most especially frogs. We have only three species of amphibians on the entire island of Ireland, so far known – one species of frog, one toad and a newt. The European Common Frog (Rana temporaria) is thriving in Wicklow and with a little effort (and sometimes none at all) can be found in meadows, hedgerows, marshes and woods. It must be remembered that all amphibians in Ireland are protected species because their role in the ecosystem is so important. They are an essential pest-control.

A handsome specimen of Common Frog which was hunting for insects in a woodland.
A handsome specimen of Common Frog which was hunting for insects in a woodland.

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