Moths of Autumn

According to the ancient Celtic calendar autumn begins in early August with the feast of Lughnasa, the ancient god, and winter begins at Martinmass (November 11), with Spring starting on Brigid’s Day (February 1). However, the weather in Ireland generally corresponds to the astronomical calendar, with Autumn beginning with the Autumn Equinox, and Winter beginning with the Winter Solstice, and ending with the Vernal (Spring) Equinox.

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The weather we have at the moment is certainly autumnal rather than wintery. In fact, we have had a classic Autumn this year, beginning mild and with temperatures almost up to those of summer, and then suddenly plummeting to frosts early on November 1. And then it became mild again, and very wet at the end of November, and now we have reached a dry spell with weather due to become frosty again. This weather is perfect for autumn moths, and this year I have seen some very interesting and beautiful ones. There have been quite a few but these ones are especially interesting. Firstly, in late November this male Feathered Thorn (Colotois pennaria) appeared after a female had briefly waited in the same place. This species flies from September until early December.

A handsome male Feathered Thorn.
A handsome male Feathered Thorn. This moth is about the size of an average butterfly species.

Next was the larger Mottled Umber (Erannis defoliaria), a moth which flies from October until January, and seems to like it colder than most moths. The male and female are easy to tell apart because the female has no wings and doesn’t even look very much like a moth. Hopefully I’ll get a photo of one soon to upload.

A very striking Mottled Umber. These moths can be very variable in pattern and colouration. Well, the males can be...
A very striking Mottled Umber. These moths can be very variable in pattern and colouration. Well, the males can be…

Finally, a drab but common moth which comes to windows frequently is the November Moth (Epirrita dilutata) which flies from September until early December, weather-permitting.  Although this one looks large in the photo these moths are actually only as large as a thumbnail.

The very grey November Moth.
The very grey November Moth.

2 thoughts on “Moths of Autumn”

  1. Our autumn was not too temperature cool until this last week. We recently have had some super snowy days and wind and cold. I have already shovelled the driveway twice whereas last year at this time there was still a lot of green grass showing. Wondering how this winter is going to be. The long range forecast says more snow and cold than for the last few years.

  2. I think we’ve had a classic autumn and we might get a little snow in January, but we’re in for a storm this weekend. I can’t complain. Your experience seems to be roughly on a par with ours, although presumably colder, being continental. I hope you have a nice Christmas and New Year.

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