Return to Spring

Anyone following this blog will realise it has been on hiatus since early March. Why so? Because although it looked like spring was breaking through, the winter became very long and drawn out. We had the coldest March since records began in 1882, and it was only two weeks ago that the temperatures suddenly became normal. Only the Monday before last ( a week and a day ago) did the temperatures rise above 15 degrees Celsius. All of this was caused by an easterly wind from Siberia, and then from the Arctic. This easterly lasted almost two months without stopping, which is extremely bizarre. Anyhow, things are now returning to normal and today was a balmy 18 degrees Celsius.

I have only seen three butterflies so far this year, two were Small Tortoiseshells and one was a Peacock (Inachis io) and both are species which hibernate. The Peacock is below.

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Most importantly, many of the spring flowers are now blooming and the hardiest, the daffodils and crocuses, have already lost their blooms – the first phase of spring is over, despite the cold. However, now it is the turn of the trees to get their blossoms, and the first I saw since temperatures warmed up was the Red Currant (Ribes rubrum), a plant of the hedgerows, beloved by bees.

The Red Currant has a very distinctive scent which to many people is the scent of spring.
The Red Currant has a very distinctive scent which to many people is the scent of spring.

You know it is getting warmer when you see the Nursery-web Spider sunbathing. This spider loves sunlight, and has a very distinctive pose, which I have mentioned many times before as resembling Leonardo Da Vinci’s Universal Man, which also has eight legs…

A Nursery-web Spider sunbathing on the rim of a tub containing flowers. It's not so big in real life as it appears in this photo.
A Nursery-web Spider sunbathing on the rim of a tub containing flowers. It’s not so big in real life as it appears in this photo.

However, for me the most exciting of all has been the appearance of the Tawny Mining Bee (Andrena fulva) and other species of solitary bee. You might remember reading, earlier in the blog, of how my garden became the first known established colony of this bee species in Ireland. That doesn’t mean they were not already here, just not known to be for certain. This week another colony was discovered in Co. Kilkenny and there are bound to be more of this handsome bee. I use the term “colony” lightly, because although the bees have appeared in large numbers, there is no single nest and each female bee takes care of her own nest and young. The males appeared first, and then the larger females, which they had to wait for to emerge from their underground chambers. The males are much smaller, and look almost like a totally different species. I will be doing a lot more about these bees in the next instalment… but you will not have to wait months for it. Tomorrow, if possible.

The male Tawny Mining Bee... actually quite small, and fast-moving when not at rest.
The male Tawny Mining Bee… actually quite small, and fast-moving when not at rest.

 

The female Tawny Mining Bee, which looks like a cuddly toy, and has the appearance of a flying ruby. She looks like a small bumblebee but has a very red bosy and a black head.
The female Tawny Mining Bee, which looks like a cuddly toy, and has the appearance of a flying ruby. She looks like a small bumblebee but has a very red body and a black head.

Finally, there are also plenty of bumblebees around. Usually the last to show up in gardens is the Carder Bee (Bombus pascuorum) and this for me puts the seal on spring. To the uninitiated the Carder Bee could be confused with the Tawny Mining Bee, except for one very clear difference – she is much larger. Here is the first Carder Bee I have seen this year, and have not seen too many since, but it takes a while for a hive to get going.

My first Carder Bee of the year, and a handsome one at that. Almost certainly a queen bee, as they overwinter and establish the new colonies each spring.
My first Carder Bee of the year, and a handsome one at that. Almost certainly a queen bee, as they are the ones that overwinter and establish each new colony in the spring.

2 thoughts on “Return to Spring”

  1. Missed your blog but realised weather to blame. E.Central Scotland has also had weeks of bitter Arctic winds.
    Saw first butterfly this week – small tortoiseshell – and first pipistrelle bat last evening. Spring flowers blooming their socks off despite a still chilly wind. This week have been following progress of a buff tailed bumblebee – suspect a queen looking for a place to nest. Plenty of holes in our drystane dykes but she is very fussy!
    Love your photos. ‘Fraid my efforts with a camera are none too professional – I need to practise!

  2. Many thanks for your generous comment, Moira! I haven’t managed to see any bats yet but other people have told me they have definitely seen them, so hopefully this week, all going well. Once the bees are around summer can’t be far away.

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