Tag Archives: blooms

The Eclipse and Equinox

St. Patrick’s Day is usually the time when spring begins to feel like spring, and this year we had a bright and dry St. Patrick’s Day. And it was the first day I noticed the power of the spring booms.

The biggest bloomers of the moment are the prickly Gorse or Furze bushes. You need to lean in close to get the scent, but it's very strong and beautiful too.
The biggest bloomers of the moment are the prickly Gorse or Furze bushes. You need to lean in close to get the scent, but it’s very strong and beautiful too.
Alexanders is a smooth relative of the hogweed which dominates the banks and hedgerows of Wicklow in spring, dying off in early summer. They creamy flowers are like cauliflower, but the unusual frangrance they produce is very much the perfume of spring. They are very important flowers as bees depend on them to make honey at this time of year.
Alexanders is a smooth relative of the hogweed which dominates the banks and hedgerows of Wicklow in spring, dying off in early summer. The creamy flowers are like cauliflower, but the unusual frangrance they produce is very much the perfume of spring. They are very important flowers as bees depend on them to make honey at this time of year.

Friday, March 20, brought with it a rare event, an eclipse of the sun, the first since August 11, 1999. It was a cloudy morning but I still managed to get some decent photos of the spectacle. 90% of the sun was eclipsed at the darkest point. Our next one won’t be until 2026.

Approaching the darkest part of the eclipse the cloud gave way temporarily to allow me this photo.
Approaching the darkest part of the eclipse the cloud gave way temporarily to allow me this photo.
Ironically this photo of the eclipse nearing its end is more impressive than the earlier photo, largely because you can see more clearly what is happening between the two heavenly bodies.
Ironically this photo of the eclipse nearing its end is more impressive than the earlier photo, largely because you can see more clearly what is happening between the two heavenly bodies.

On Friday night at 10.45 pm GMT another important event occurred – the spring equinox. This moment is the exact half-way point between the winter and summer solstices. That means that Saturday was the first day of astronomical spring. And it was a beautiful day too. I have more spring phenomena report, but just for now let’s leave it at that.

 

Definitely a Very Early Spring in Wicklow

Although much of Ireland has been covered in snow, eastern Wicklow has largely escaped despite heavy frosts, but it seems spring has definitely decided to make its presence felt. A neighbour of mine told me he had not only got spring plants above ground, but they had already begun flowering, I took these photos yesterday, January 13, in daytime temperatures of 4 degrees Celsius (roughly 40 degrees Fahrenheit).

A beautiful, abeit cultivated variety of Snowdroblooming yesterday.
A beautiful, abeit cultivated variety of Snowdroblooming yesterday.
A beautiful daffodil, clearly an early variety, but daffodils are well above ground all across Wicklow.
A beautiful daffodil, clearly an early variety, but daffodils are well above ground all across Wicklow. According to my neighbour this and other daffodils in his garden have been blooming since mid-December.
A small primrose with a delicate yellow bloom in my neighbour's garden. Incredibly I'm finding wild primroses starting to bloom around the Wicklow landscape.
A small primrose with a delicate yellow bloom in my neighbour’s garden. Incredibly I’m finding wild primroses starting to bloom around the Wicklow landscape.

 

May Blooms

May is the most spectacular month in Wicklow. This is due to the sudden mass-blossoming of the various trees and shrubs along the hedgerows and in the parks and gardens. May is usually quite warm too, and it is this year, but there is quite a bit of rain too, which also helps the blooming, but can cause them to fade a little faster too.

Hawthorn is one of the most beautiful blooming plants and can be found right along Wicklow hedgerows.
Hawthorn is one of the most beautiful blooming plants and can be found right along Wicklow hedgerows.
The apple blossoms are all but gone now, but they were absolutely spectacular this year and gave Wicklow its scent of spring. In this photo you can see tulip flowers too. Apple trees are very common in Wicklow and there are many old orchards, and even apple trees growing in hedgerows.
The apple blossoms are all but gone now, but they were absolutely spectacular this year and gave Wicklow its scent of spring. In this photo you can see tulip flowers too. Apple trees are very common in Wicklow and there are many old orchards, and even apple trees growing in hedgerows.
Lilac trees are not quite as numerous as hawthorns, but they are common and widespread along hedgerows and in gardens and their magnificent flowerspikes produce a heavy yet subtle perfume that actually makes the air smell fresh. This year they had a bumper blossoming making for a fantastic May.
Lilac trees are not quite as numerous as hawthorns, but they are common and widespread along hedgerows and in gardens and their magnificent flowerspikes produce a heavy yet subtle perfume that actually makes the air smell fresh. This year they had a bumper blossoming making for a fantastic May.
The so-called 'Wedding Cake' Viburnum is a magnificent shrub which, for some reason, is very common in Wicklow and produces huge swathes of blossom but no fragrance. However, they are extremely popular with insects, especially hoverflies.
The so-called ‘Wedding Cake’ Viburnum is a magnificent shrub which, for some reason, is very common in Wicklow and produces huge swathes of blossom but no fragrance. However, they are extremely popular with insects, especially hoverflies.
The bluebells came up early this year and are still forming carpets of blue in the mountains, but I don't think they'll be around too long, so make sure to get out and look for them. You can tell the true native bluebell from the similar Spanish bluebell because only the native has a scent, and it's a beautiful scent too.
The bluebells came up early this year and are still forming carpets of blue in the mountains, but I don’t think they’ll be around too long, so make sure to get out and look for them. You can tell the true native bluebell from the similar Spanish bluebell because only the native has a scent, and it’s a beautiful scent too.
In boggy areas (of which there are many in Wicklow) the Yellow Flag is the dominant flowering plant and they can be seen in huge numbers in coastal marshes right now. These beautiful plants are irises and they can be kept next to garden ponds, but the root can be more than a metre under the soil, which is usually under almost as much water in the areas these plants inhabit, so digging them up is certainly not worth the effort. Leave them where they are and admire from afar.
In boggy areas (of which there are many in Wicklow) the Yellow Flag is the dominant flowering plant and they can be seen in huge numbers in coastal marshes right now. These beautiful plants are irises and they can be kept next to garden ponds, but the root can be more than a metre under the soil, which is usually under almost as much water in the areas these plants inhabit, so digging them up is certainly not worth the effort. Leave them where they are and admire from afar.