Tag Archives: “wild flowers”

Flower Power

We are now at the height of the summer flowering, and wild flowers are now at their most abundant, as are cultivated flowers in gardens. The flowering should continue through to the end of August and into September without a problem, so long as the weather stays reasonably good. The rains of the last few days have really helped the soil and enhanced the blooming. And, as a direct result, there has been an explosion in the insect population, particularly butterflies, moths, bees and hoverflies.

A Red-tailed Bumblebee taking pollen from a Cornflower. These bees are obsessed with the colours blue and purple, and are attracted to blue Cornflowers and big thistle heads, but will often ignore the same species in a different colour. There's a mystery here to be solved...
A Red-tailed Bumblebee taking pollen from a Cornflower. These bees are obsessed with the colours blue and purple, and are attracted to blue Cornflowers and big thistle heads, but will often ignore the same species in a different colour. There’s a mystery here to be solved…

The meadow in the photo above was planted by me. It was an experiment, and has been so successful I’m going to be doing it again next year on a grander scale. This little meadow is the equivalent of a coral reef on dry land and has attracted some less common garden visitors, such as the Small Copper butterfly, which you can see below.

The Small Copper is a very small but striking butterfly only slightly larger than my thumbnail. It can blend into the background perfectly when it wants to, simply by folding its wings, which are camouflaged on the undersides.
The Small Copper is a very small but striking butterfly only slightly larger than my thumbnail. It can blend into the background perfectly when it wants to, simply by folding its wings, which are camouflaged on the undersides.

As beautiful as the butterflies are, they have some serious competition from the moths. A very interesting medium-sized moth coming to house lights at the moment is the Burnished Brass. It gets its name because its wings look like they are literally made of brass. But illustrations in books and photographs often fail to do them justice. However, by sheer force of luck, I think I might have managed it with the photo below.

I photographed this Burnished Brass last night. The wings always remind me of fancy sweet wrappers. That's candy wrappers to you Americans.
I photographed this Burnished Brass last night as it rested on a window. The wings always remind me of fancy sweet wrappers. That’s candy wrappers to you Americans.

But the big moths are not the only interesting or pretty ones. It’s easy to overlook the very small ones, but a closer inspection can reveal incredible patterns and colours. The tiny moth in the photo below is a combination of caricature and beauty, one of many small species that live in the meadows and come to light at night time. As yet it has no common name, so any wit out there can try his or her hand at coming up with an appropriate one, and seeing if it sticks. Only time will tell.

Agriphila selasella is a very common species in Wicklow, but is badly in need of an art common name. 'Meadow Pointer' is my stab at it.
Agriphila selasella is a very common species in Wicklow, but is badly in need of an apt common name. ‘Meadow Pointer’ is my stab at it.

Some of the best meadowland in Wicklow actually lies along the seashore. This week I spotted my first Hummingbird Hawkmoth of the year feeding on the small dense yellow cloud-like flower-clusters of Ladies’ Bedstraw in one of these beach meadows. While you are down there you still have time to see how the Horned Poppy gets its name, as they have their long seedpods which look like horns. The one in the photo below is a classic example.

A Horned Poppy on a Wicklow beach, looking almost like a sculpture.
A Horned Poppy on a Wicklow beach, looking almost like a sculpture, or some strange walking plant.

 

 

The Greatest Show in town…

In Wicklow Town, that is. And this show might not last all summer long, so get down to the Murrough in Wicklow as fast as you can on a sunny day. A beauiful little accident has occurred. An area by the coast that was off-limits due to some public works taking place was supposed to be ploughed and then rolled so that the area would return to grassland. Instead it was ploughed, but due to an oversight it was not rolled. Instead of grass growing “weeds” began to appear, and many local people were very angry about it. But now the weeds have blossomed and this small area of Wicklow has turned into a little piece of heaven on earth.

The incredible wild flower meadow on Wicklow Town's seafront.

It is brimful of fantastic meadow flowers as only newly ploughed ground can be. This is their rare window of opportunity and so they don’t hesitate to take advantage of it, with seeds that have lain dormant for years bursting into life, and plants bursting into blossom. Sun yellow flowers of Corn Marigold (Chrysanthemum segetum) and bright white Corn Chamomile (Anthemis arvensis) dominate, but their colours are speckled by the bold red of the Common Poppy (Papaver rhoeas), stunning blue of the Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) and the purple and pink flowers of Common Fumitory (Fumaria officinalis).

A wall of colour, prepare to be stunned.

From the undergrowth up

When autumn arrives it starts at the top and works down: the leaves fall off the trees, the undergrowth loses its shelter and dies back and in some species it even retreats underground. The shelter of the leaves, and plants goes and the earth is largely exposed to the atmosphere, causing it to cool. In spring the opoosite situation arises. Spring starts from the ground and works up. As the light increases a race among the plants begins. The first undergrowth plants to begin growing are ivy and Dog Violets. The violets grow very low to the ground, but rely on insects to pollinate them, so have to start flowering very early, usually in February.

Common Dog Violets (Viola riviniana) are beautiful little flowers appearing in early spring.

Soon after the violets appear the densely-growing leaves of Lesser Celandine appear, followed by a sea of luminous yellow flowers. Lesser Celandine is in the buttercup family. This plant flowers from now into the summer, and smothers the violets, although the usually continue growing alongside quite happily.

Lesser Celandine (Ranunculus vicaria)

Lesser Celandine is a very important plant because it provides a lot of nectar for insects, and is one of their main food flowers before the shrubs and trees begin to flower. Dog Violets and Lesser Celandine are normally found in wooded areas or along hedgerows and thrive before the leaves appear in the canopies.

In more open land, such as meadows and fields, Primroses begin to flower. They are another extremely common wildflower species in Wicklow. They often flower beneath layers of snow, so are not good indicators of warm weather, but certainly are most numerous in the warmer weather of March.

Primrose (Primula vulgaris)

However, for most people the quintessential symbol of spring is the daffodil. Although daffodils are found everywhere growing wild along roadsides in Wicklow, they are not a native species to Ireland. With the exception of crocuses and violets, the blooms of the Wicklow spring are predominantly yellow, like the spring sun.

 

Daffodils (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) growing in the outskirts of a Wicklow village.