Tag Archives: beautiful

Moth Weather

Before continuing on the subject of moths I would just like to wish all students starting their Leaving Cert and Junior Certs tomorrow the very best of luck. Having done my fair share of exams I can tell you that the best thing you can do is close the books well before midnight, relax and then get to bed and get a good sleep. It’s better than any amount of last minute studying. And if you can’t sleep, don’t try. Just let it happen.

Now, back to the moths: we have some very heavy and moist weather at the moment and whereas we find it annoying the moths love it. You will probably see most of them near your windows at night, or the following morning, having been attracted by the light. One of the most common is this little beauty, the Garden Carpet – Xanthorhoe fluctuata:

A Garden Carpet resting the morning after the night before.
A Garden Carpet resting the morning after the night before.

There are also some bigger moths around, and they don’t all fly at night. A few days ago this handsome butterfly-sized Scalloped Hazel - Odontopera bidentata - flew in the door and landed on the inner side of the frame. This is perfectly natural behaviour, except the moth will usually land on a tree trunk and rely on its camouflage to keep it hidden from birds.

A Scalloped Hazel at rest on a door frame.
A Scalloped Hazel at rest on a door frame.

The largest moths found in Wicklow are the various species of hawkmoth, known to those in America as sphinx moths. It is no exaggeration to say that some of them are the size of small birds, and can be mistaken as such. The most common species that turns up in Wicklow gardens is not quite that large, but is bigger than most butterflies, the Poplar Hawkmoth – Laothoe populi – and will be about the largest moth most people will see in their lives outside of the tropics. It has a peculiar habit of resting with its hind-wings positioned level with its head, sticking out from under the forewings, as you can see in this photo I took a few days ago:

A very handsome specimen of Poplar Hawkmoth. This one is a male, as you can tell from the comb-like antennae. Females have straight wire-like ones.
A very handsome specimen of Poplar Hawkmoth. This one is a male, as you can tell from the comb-like antennae. Females have straight wire-like ones.

Watch out for the Silver-Y

Right now Wicklow is swarming with Silver-Ys, muscular moths which migrate from North Africa and southern Europe every summer. Some years they are in small numbers, and some years in large ones, and this year they are in the latter. You will see them flying by night mostly, but individuals are very noticeable by day too, moving from place to place or perching on walls and windows. They come to garden plants by night in hovering swarms which are very impressive.

A Silver-Y feeding on garden pinks in my garden.
A Silver-Y feeding on garden pinks in my garden.

The moth’s scientific name, Autographa gamma, literally means ‘self-written y’. Both the common and scientific name are due to a silver-coloured ‘y’ marking on each forewing, as you can see clearly in the photo below.

A Silver-Y feeding on Bouncing Bet, a wild flower which is also cultivated.
A Silver-Y feeding on Bouncing Bet, a wild flower which is also cultivated.

Silver-Y moths are believed to attempt to migrate home in autumn, but some will instead opt to hibernate, and with some success as I have discovered them springing to life in sheds in springtime. It’s difficult to know how long they can live but we do know Painted Lady butterflies not only migrate from North Africa to Ireland, but also can successfully make the return journey in autumn, so the robust Silver-Y should be equally capable of this feat. As with so much in nature, however, it remains to be conclusively proven.

Welcome to Wicklow, Michelle Obama!

A nice surprise for us this week was the sudden announcement of the visit of the vivacious US First Lady, Michelle Obama. Today she’s getting a tour of Glendalough, a very ancient site which should have been included on the World Heritage List decades ago, but has been ignored continually by successive Irish governments, despite the importance of tourism to Ireland. Anyhow, I leave you with some photos of Glendalough I took last week, featuring my brother Owen, an archaeologist by training, and his wife, Alla.

The monastic city of Glendalough, which might actually be pre-Christian in origin despite its association with Christianity.
The monastic city of Glendalough, which might actually be pre-Christian in origin despite its association with Christianity.
Ruined church dating to 11th century.
Ruined cathedral dating from the 11th century.
The famous round tower of Glendalough. Even when you are standing near one it is extremely difficult to judge the scale of what you are looking at, but there are some people standing at the base of it, and they look absolutely tiny.
The famous round tower of Glendalough. Even when you are standing near one it is extremely difficult to judge the scale of what you are looking at, but there are some people standing at the base of it, and they look absolutely tiny. These were among the tallest structures in Europe for almost a thousand years. This one is dated to the 9th or 10th century AD, but the Glendalough complex is far older.