Tag Archives: bird

Cooler Temperatures

Autumn conditions this year began almost exactly with the Autumn Equinox and temperatures have become steadily cooler since then. There are still green leaves on many trees but much of the foliage is yellow or red and showers of cold rain and some northern breezes have reduced temperatures a lot.

Lower temperatures slow the growth of plant life, but also have an immediate effect on insect populations, killing many of them and sending others into torpor or hibernation. Despite this there are still some hardy species to be seen around, including some rarities, such as the very rare and beautifully marked Juniper Shieldbug (Cyphostethus tristriatus). I found this one last weekend, and it is the first recorded in Ireland since 2016. There were only 15 recorded in Ireland before this one:

They are probably far more common than the recorded numbers suggest. Keep an eye out for them.

There are many other insects which are very numerous in Autumn, such as the 22-spot Ladybird (Psyllobora vigintiduopunctata), which seems very at home in the Autumn landscape:

Although temperatures are usually hovering around 10°C, on sunny days some butterflies reach the 15°C necessary in order to fly. Today I found a Red Admiral flying about, feeding on the few remaining blooms of Butterfly Bush:

Some insects are very obvious, such as the handsome little 22=spot Ladybird (Sometimes you might not realise you are looking at an insect, or insect activity. If you can find an oak tree of any size, see if they have oak “apples”. As everyone knows acorns are the fruit of the oak tree. Oak apples are not fruit but look far more like fruit than acorns do:

   Oak apples are actually growths caused by tiny insects, oak gall wasps, which somehow create them by making a change happen at a molecular level. These growths are protective pods in which the insect grubs grow and develop. Eventually they hatch out, fly away, mate, and lay eggs on an oak tree.

Although there are fewer insects there are still lots of attractive birds about, and in autumn it’s often easier to get close to them than in summer, as they are forced to forage closer to human habitation. One particularly difficult bird to see is the Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis), but as foliage surrounding ponds and lakes begins to die back they become more apparent:

One bird that is very easy to spot because of it’s bold white colouration is the Little Egret (Egretta garzetta). This bird was very rare in Europe and almost extinct up until the 1950s. The reason for its rarity was due to overhunting for its head plumes, which were used in ladies’ hats back in the days when ladies wore ridiculously ornate hats on a daily basis. In fact, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the RSPB, was originally set up with the aim of protecting the few remaining individuals of this species living on the island of Great Britain:

How did such a rare species come to be living in Ireland, of all places. Incredibly this species is no longer rare. In fact, they can be found all across Europe in huge numbers due to the decline in the fashion for ridiculous hats. For reasons which are not yet understood they migrated into Ireland and can now bee seen in huge numbers along the coast, or on rivers and lakes.

Beautiful Tropical Birds Visit Wicklow

In January there were reports of beautiful tropical wading birds called Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) having somehow arrived in Ireland. Three of them found their way to the East Coast Nature Reserve on the Wicklow Coast and have been the focus of huge attention, the area becoming almost a pilgrimage site. And, most remarkably, they don’t shun the attention at all. They are not scared of people.

They are very dark birds, kind of like a choclate brown combined with shimmering dark purple. They have long beaks which they use to probe the boggy ground for insects.

What everybody is wondering is if they are going to stay in Ireland, like the Little Egret did in the 1990s. They are found mostly in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia and Australasia, but in the mid-19th century Glossy Ibises flew across the Atlantic to Brazil and have since colonised much of the Americas. Could they make a permanent colony here too, despite our cold conditions? We’ll know soon enough.

Here is a video I made about them, easily the most exciting nature event in Ireland, and Wicklow, in a few years:

The Autumn Equinox

Tonight, and only a short time ago,  at 9.02 am local time here in Wicklow (8.02 pm GMT) was the exact halfway point between the Summer Solstice and the Winter Solstice. To put it bluntly, this is the definite end of summer and start of autumn, and from now until the Vernal Equinox next March each day will be shorter than the night. And the birds know that, so they’re fattening up, increasing their energy reserves by eating the various berries on the myriad trees and bushes which are brimming with them right now. Here’s a photo I got of a male House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) feeding on blackberries:

   And now butterflies are disappearing fast, although there are Large Whites, Green-veined Whites, Red Admirals, Peacocks and Small Tortoiseshells still to be seen in small numbers. The latter two will hibernate and need to find suitable accomodation relatively soon if they are to make it to spring. However, the most numerous butterfly at this time of the year, and the one that blends in best with the autumn colours, is the Speckled Wood, which is usually the last species seen along hedgerows in the autumn. Their numbers are falling too, though. This September has been cooler than those we’ve had in recent years and that’s probably a factor.

But, if any creature plucks the heart strings more than others as it disappears from the landscape it’s the Swallow, You can still see some in our skies, but they’re flying south-east at speed, and usually not playfully hunting for insects as they were a few weeks ago. Now they have no time to waste and need to get to southern Europe and across the Sahara Desert to southern Africa with some degree of urgency, as the insect population on which they depend crashes in the colder, less sunny climate of autumn. There’s still a lot to enjoy out there though, and I’ll be doing my best to showcase it. Here is my slightly out-of-focus photo of a Swallow flyng quickly south,  and quite high up, this morning. I guess this is farewell and bon voyage, until next March or April: