Tag Archives: botany

Drought Weather

This year easterly weather brought us a very cold and snowy March, and the same  prevailing weather trend is now bringing us a very warm and dry summer. In fact, here in Wicklow we are now suffering a drought as we have had so little rainfall.  In Ireland, but especially in Wicklow, weather from the east always causes extreme events, but occurs only occasionally. However, many trees are blossoming longer than usual, including the once sacred Elder tree (Sambucus nigra ), and contributing to hay fever conditions. Elder has a very beautiful scent:

Also, one of our most beautiful shrubs is now blooming, the Fuchsia (Fuchsia magellanica). This species is not native to Ireland at all,  being introduced from Tierra Del Fuego in southern Argentina, and from Chile. Ironically Ireland is considered the best place in the world to see Fuchsias now:

In these extremely hot weather conditions you will more than likely find yourself at the seaside, and here you might well see large numbers of a strange kind of bee flying just an inch or so (or centimetres, if you prefer) above the sandy ground. If you are lucky enough to see one of these creatures land for a moment you might actually manage to pick out the details of its unusual appearance, and you might also realise that it’s not a bee at all, but a fly – the Bee Fly (Villa modesta):

Dandelion Explosion!

This year we have had a very cold spring, and most plants and wildflowers are way behind their normal growth levels, but yet again the humble and resilient Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) has saved the day.

Dandelions can flower all year, but in April they absolutely explode into blooming and our environment and our food depends on the fact that the massive amounts of pollen produced by the dandelion blooming sustain vital pollinating insects at a time that would otherwise be a crisis for them, and then result in a crisis for us. In fact, I believe we should have a dandelion festival every year to celebrate this most important of all spring wildflowers. This is my video dedicated to the dandelion:

Above is one of our rarest pollinators, the Tawny Mining Bee (Andrena fulva) and this species also depends heavily on the dandelion for pollen, especially as this bee emerges in late March and flies mostly in April, and to a lesser degree in May, before dying off by early June and not being seen again until the following spring.

However, big bumblebees depend on them too, like this huge Buff-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus terrestris).  Let’s celebrate the dandelions.  They deserve it.

St. Brigid’s Day

I know what you’re wondering – where have I been for the month of January? I’ll tell you – sick with the worst dose of flu I’ve had in 22 years! But I’m almost over it.

According to Irish tradition the first day of February, which is St. Brigid’s Day, is the beginning of spring. And, considering that the term ‘spring’ refers to the ‘springing forth’ of plantlife, then it is usually pretty accurate. However, this year, despite a good cold January and a very cold and blustery first day of spring, has seen very early plant growth – the earliest I’ve ever seen. Daffodils rose out of the ground in late December and I saw my first daffodil blooms last weekend!

   And this is not an early type of daffodil. However, the crocuses beat the daffodils to it, just.

The crocus above was the first crocus bloom I saw this year, and it appeared las week during a short bout of freakishly warm weather which lasted four days. But the Early Crocuses I usually rely on as the definitive announcement of the arrival of spring have not risen yet, let alone bloomed, so maybe they think we still could get snow. However, other spring plants, usually much later than daffodils and crocuses, have already made an appearance. Check these out:

They are, of course, snowdrops, which are usually the earliest bloomers of the spring plants, although they are technically more winter flowers. However, in snowy areas they usually signal the end of carpeting snowfalls. What is really strange is how quickly these much less hardy plants have jumped out of the ground:

These are the relatively delicate leaves of Lords-and-Ladies, aka Cuckoo-pint, aka Arum Lily (Arum maculatum) which normally break out of the ground in February but don’t unfurl their leaves like this until March at the earliest, yet here they are. And here’s something more impressive:

Believe it or not, these are bluebells! I have never seen them appear out of the ground quite so early, and looking so robust. However, there are also insects astir, including this extremely early moth, the Pale Brindled Beauty (Phigalia pilosaria):

The male is a stocky moth, shown here, and the female is wingless. This species is around from January until March, so it’s not exactly early. To make things interesting there are two varieties of this species. Both have silky ‘silver screen’ underwings.