Tag Archives: butterfly

Butterfly Colour

August is actually the best time to see most butterflies in Wicklow. They are quite tolerant of rain so long as they get as much sun, and flowering plants to feed on. The Butterfly Bush (Buddleia davidii) is the most favoured plant due to its masses of blooms in the form of flower-spikes. And here is a handsome Peacock butterfly feeding on Buddleia:

The Peacock is one of the most easily recognisable butterflies due the large eye-like markings on its wings. markings.
The Peacock is one of the most easily recognisable butterflies due the large eye-like markings on its wings. markings.

Sometimes it can be a little difficult to see how truly beautlful a butterfly is, until you see its colours contrasted against a more solid background, as in the case of this Peacock basking on a plank:

Stunning colours of a quite common buttefly in August. Get out there and look for it on buddeia and you will be rewarded with a definite sighting.
Stunning colours of a quite common buttefly in August. Get out there and look for it on buddeia and you will be rewarded with a definite sighting.

The other big butterfly that is easy to find on buddleia bushes in August is the Red Admiral. Worldwide it is also very common, being found all across Europe and Asia and North America:

The beautiful Red Admiral actually has very little on it compared to other butterflies, yet the red is the bit you'll remember when it flies past.
The beautiful Red Admiral actually has very little on it compared to other butterflies, yet the red is the bit you’ll remember when it flies past.

Progenies of a Warm Summer

This year Wicklow was blessed by a very warm spring and summer. August has brought some heavy rain belts, most recently the remains of Hurricane Bertha, which passed across the island overnight, but all in all it has been a very good year. The most unusual thing I came across this year was a nest of Norwegian Wasps (Dolichovespula norvegica) which nested in a buddleia bush in my own garden. These wasps and the similar Tree Wasp look like the Common Wasp but make their nests only in trees and shrubs. It was my first time seeing them and they are considered a relatively new arrival in Ireland.  They can only be positively identified by the markings on their faces… and that isn’t easy to do but a camera makes it easier.

The nest of the Norwegian Wasps wound around the bracnhes of a butterfly bush, with some wasps perched on the outside.
The nest of the Norwegian Wasps wound around the bracnhes of a butterfly bush, with some wasps perched on the outside.

They soon got used to my approach, although were still in the habit of buzzing strangers who came near the gate. But in the last few weeks the wasp population has crashed across all species. Instead of wasps there are near identical hoverflies feeding on fallen fruit. But the butterflies are doing exceptionally well this year. Especially this beauty, the Small Tortoiseshell, which can be seen wherever there are butterfly bushes and warm walls and fences to bask on.

One of the most beautiful of our native butterflies, the Small Tortoiseshell is also long-lived and hibernates through the winter.This one pictured is feeding on mustard nectar.
One of the most beautiful of our native butterflies, the Small Tortoiseshell is also long-lived and hibernates through the winter.This one pictured is feeding on mustard nectar.

However, the damp conditions certainly suit some creatures, most especially frogs. We have only three species of amphibians on the entire island of Ireland, so far known – one species of frog, one toad and a newt. The European Common Frog (Rana temporaria) is thriving in Wicklow and with a little effort (and sometimes none at all) can be found in meadows, hedgerows, marshes and woods. It must be remembered that all amphibians in Ireland are protected species because their role in the ecosystem is so important. They are an essential pest-control.

A handsome specimen of Common Frog which was hunting for insects in a woodland.
A handsome specimen of Common Frog which was hunting for insects in a woodland.

Longhorn Moths and Silver-Ys

I said it before, and I’ll say it again, you really do not know what you’re going to find round the next bend in the road in Wicklow. Here’s something really remarkable I found feeding on the Cow Parsley – a Longhorn Moth:

Longhorn Moths, just like Longhorn Beetles, get their name from their extremely long antennae, which in this species are truly immense.
Longhorn Moths, just like Longhorn Beetles, get their name from their extremely long antennae, which in this species are truly immense, being almost twice the length of the moth’s body.

And the excitement didn’t end there – this particular species is one of the two most colourful species found in Ireland, known only by its scientific name of Adela croesella.  It is (as far as I know) only found in the Burren, on the west coast of Ireland. So to find it in Wicklow is very exciting. Only the males have such long antennae, apparently to impress the females with, as is often the case with extremely exaggerated bodily appendages.

A Silver-Y moth, named after the beautiful 'y' shaped mark on its wings, which is upside down when the wings are folded, as in this photo.
A Silver-Y moth, named after the beautiful ‘y’ shaped mark on its wings, which is upside down when the wings are folded, as in this photo.

Today I was very glad to find my first Silver-Y of the year, which had to be rescued from a polytunnel. Silver-Ys migrate to Ireland from southern Europe and North Africa, and it seems they also attempt the return journey, although some will attempt to survive the winter in greenhouses. This one might actually be a larva which hatched out in the polytunnel itself.

Finally, a word about camouflage – for anyone who doubt species of white butterfly have adequate camouflage, just look at this female Green-veined White feeding on a cystus flower – truly impressive camouflage as it feeds:

Just another petal on one of many flowers unless you look more closesly.
Just another petal on one of many flowers unless you look more closesly.