Tag Archives: Eratigena atrica

The Mouse Spider, for those who are worried

A few people have been asking me about the Mouse Spider, following a scary story in the media this week about a British man who was bitten by one which had somehow climbed into his bathrobe. The man had an allergic reaction causing his back to swell up, and it was because of his own knowledge of spiders he was able to identify the spider as a Mouse Spider (Scotophaeus blackwalli). The media went into overdrive, some reporting that the Mouse Spider is a close relative of the deadly Australian Sydney Funnel-web spider. This is a mistake – there are a number of species of spider in Australia known as Mouse Spiders, and they are related to the Sydney Funnel-web, but they are no relation to the much smaller European Mouse Spider. Here is a photo I managed to take of the European Mouse Spider in May 2015 – I haven’t seen one since then:

The common name for this species comes from the fact it has mouse-coloured hair on its abdomen – it is nowhere near as large as a mouse, and, in fact, appears quite a bit smaller than the so-called Giant House Spider (Eratigena atrica) which terrifies so many people in the autumn, when big long-legged males enter houses cruising for females. Here is one of these harmless terrors I photographed a few weeks ago:

The Mouse Spider is a stocky, slow-moving spider which is native to Northern Europe, including the British Isles, and widespread but very rarely encountered by ordinary householders. It tends to like bark and stones to live under, and will wander around at night, hunting small invertebrates by sneaking up on them. The female has a reputation for biting if handled, but it is a shy species and definitely doesn’t go looking for trouble. The body of the female would be about as large as the body of a female Giant House Spider, but the legs are far shorter and it is, in many ways, more handsome. The bites are usually harmless although definitely noteworthy, but an allergic reaction is always possible with any creature capable of biting or stinging.

The best way of keeping spiders out of your house is to not leave doors open at night, in the morning or approaching darkness, and to check outside before opening windows. Also, do clean your home regularly to prevent them making themselves comfortable.

Fledglings and Maybugs

It was a tough spring for the birds because temperatures were almost relentlessly below normal, causing plants to bloom, blossom and leaf late, and insects to be in short supply. I was surprised to see the Blackbird above with such a large fledgling chick. I had put some cream out for them, cream which had just gone off, but they loved it.

Two Cockchafer beetles - the males have rooster-like red combs on their antennae.
Two Cockchafer beetles – the males have rooster-like red combs on their antennae.

Last Thursday was our first really warm sunny summer-like day and later that night I found Maybugs, better known as Cockchafer Beetles, coming to the lights of the house in huge numbers. In fact, I’ve never seen so many at one time. They will be flying around Wicklow skies until late in June, and possibly even into July.  They are heavy beetles and when one very big one accidentally blundered into the web of a female Giant House Spider the poor spider was quite at a loss what to do, as the beetle was a bit bigger than its usuall prey. The Cockchafer fell out of the web soon after, ably assisted by gravity:

When spider dreams come true they're generally too big to handle.
When spider dreams come true they’re generally too big to handle.