Tag Archives: Eristalis tenax

St. Patrick’s Day and the start of true Spring

Because the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Greystones yesterday was so spectacular, and large, and blessed by sunny weather, I opted to upload that video on its own, and devote a second video to my annual St. Patrick’s Day nature walk. This year’s was far less dramatic, but far more beautiful, although the weather did get interesting later in the day, with showers of freezing rain and hailstones. So here is the video, but read on after it too:

Whereas last year it snowed the day after St. Patrick’s Day, today something more welcome occurred – I found my first Tawny Mining Bee of the season, and it was a female, the earliest female of this species I’ve ever found. She appears at the end of the video too, but here’s a close-up shot of this very beautiful bee:

St. Patrick’s Day is traditionally held on the anniversary of St. Patrick’s death. However, in ancient times 17th March was a very important feast day, that of the god of fertility, Bacchus, aka Dionysius, marking the arrival of true Spring. Because astronomical spring in Ireland also marks the arrival of warmer spring weather. This coming Wednesday, 20th March, is the Equinox. At 9.58 in the evening the earth is exactly halfway on it’s journey around the Sun, and day and night are of equal length and the Sun rises directly in the east and sets directly in the west. From that day on, until the Summer Solstice in June, the days get progressively longer than the nights. Exciting.

 

Spring Creatures Awaken

It’s after midnight now, but here are the photos I promised in the last instalment. Firstly, I saw my first hover fly of the year and it was one of our most common and recognisable species, Syrphus ribesii.

This species has very bold patterns and to the casual observer looks like a wasp.
This species has very bold patterns and to the casual observer looks like a wasp.

Feeding on the flowers of the same shrub (a Viburnum) was a Honey Bee (Apis mellifera), the first I’ve seen this spring. Clearly the rise in temperatures matters to bees as much as hover flies.

A Honey Bee hovering as it decides which flowers to collect pollen from.
A Honey Bee hovering as it decides which flowers to collect pollen from.

A short time later I spotted my second hover fly, a Drone Fly (Eristalis tenax). Drone Flies are large, harmless flies that mimic Honey Bees, which have stings. In spring people often think they are looking at thousands of Honey Bees on the flowers but there are in fact very few bees and a huge number of loud, boisterous Drone Flies. Like all hover flies, and bees, they are important pollinators of plants.

Drone Flies have enormous eyes that meet in the middle. Bees have two large eyes at the sides of their heads and three tiny ocelli mounted on the tops of their heads between their eyes. You can easily see this is a fly. Also, bees usually fold their wings over their backs whereas flies like this one have them resting side-by-side.
Drone Flies have enormous eyes that meet in the middle. Bees have two large eyes at the sides of their heads and three tiny ocelli mounted on the tops of their heads between their eyes. You can easily see this one is a fly. Also, bees usually fold their wings over their backs whereas flies like this one, have them resting side-by-side.

Finally, although it’s not an insect and I saw it the previous day, here is another creature exhibiting spring behaviour – a female Blackbird collecting dried grass to line her nest.

This Blackbird has found a lot of dried grass. Nest-building is busy work for birds in spring.
This Blackbird has found a lot of dried grass. Nest-building is busy work for birds in spring.