Tag Archives: naturalist

Daffodils and spiders

The daffodil bud from my last bulletin has only opened now, but crocuses have risen above ground, and I have also found the fleshy leaves of tulips! However, these flowers all appeared last year around this time, or even a little later,  and we still got some very heavy snow and cold conditions later in the year, in March.

Before things got too interesting this spring I wanted to do something about False Widow spiders. According to this January’s issue of the BBC Wildlife Magazine there is a wave of terror in England, particularly around London, caused by the presence of these venomous spiders. And, more worryingly, pesticides are being used in an ad hoc way to placate public fear, and pesticides are far more dangerous than any False Widows. Two species of False Widow spider are venomous and can bite people, but they are not aggressive, and to prove this I have made a video in which I handle a good size Noble False Widow spider, with no ill-effects. Here is that video:

True Spring… at last

Scarcely a week has passed since we had our unexpected snow storm, but at last true spring has begun, and here is a little video I made of the transition, and the exciting arrival of a Treecreeper (Certhia familiaris), a small bird which creeps up walls and tree trunks feeding on insects and spiders as it goes. And then a very exciting scene which proves spring is, at last, definitely here:

However, not only have birds been collecting nesting materials, but finally frogspawn appeared in my garden pond, and lots of it:

This is the spawn of the Common Frog, Rana temporaria.  For those of you who are wondering what the green on the pond is, it is actually tiny leaves of Duckweed, a plant which exists only as a leaf, and which reproduces by cell division – one leaf turns into two, two into four, four into eight, eight into sixteen. And that is how it forms carpets of green on ponds.

The Spring Snows

Due to huge snows we had last week and over the weekend (and even now some places in Wicklow are still under snow), I had hoped this week I would be showing photos of exotic northern birds such as the Redwing, Fieldfare and the Bohemian Waxwing, but I didn’t see any whatsoever. You will find photos of Redwing and Waxwing in my photos from previous years but for now I will leave you with photos of the snow as it appeared here in eastern Wicklow on the weekend. Hopefully this represents the end of what has been a long and cold winter for us: