Tag Archives: “primula vulgaris”

At the End of February

Today is the last day of February and the weather is a bit stormy right now, but considerably milder than it has been. However, we had daytime temperatures briefly climb up to 16 degrees Celsius two days ago, and stay at 12 degrees Celsius through the following night, which led to a wonderful surprise the following morning – frogspawn.

A beautiful blob of crystal jelly frogspawn. A good sign of an established spring, but we can't rule out heavy frosts just yet.
A beautiful blob of crystal jelly frogspawn. A good sign of an established spring, but we can’t rule out heavy frosts just yet.

There have been some other signs of warmer sunnier weather, although much less spectacular than frogspawn. Namely, 7-spot Ladybirds and Green Shieldbugs sunbathing on plants on warmer afternoons.

The 7-spot is the most common and recognisable of our ladybird species. In early spring these predatory beetles sunbathe and feed on the pollen of early flowers. Later it will be insects.
The 7-spot is the most common and recognisable of our ladybird species. In early spring these predatory beetles sunbathe and feed on the pollen of early flowers. Later it will be eating small insects.
Green Shieldbugs are probably the most common species in Wicklow, and they can be found all year. In winter they often turn brown to blend in with brown leaves. However, in gardens they often can remain green due to evergreen bushes and trees of many varieties. They are very sociable insects and feed on plant sap.
Green Shieldbugs are probably the most common species in Wicklow, and they can be found all year. In winter they often turn brown to blend in with brown leaves. However, in gardens they often can remain green due to evergreen bushes and trees of many varieties. They are very sociable insects and feed on plant sap.

Wild primroses (Primula vulgaris) have also begun to bloom all over Wicklow. You can see them along hedgerows, usually on exposed banks at the bottom of trees. They really stand out at this time of year.

Primroses won't usually open fully until they are satisfied with the weather. This one is in a somewhat shady area and unwilling to completely unfurl.
Primroses won’t usually open fully until they are satisfied with the weather. This one is in a somewhat shady area and unwilling to completely unfurl.

But probably the most important flower of all to bloom in spring is also the most overlooked and least appreciated – the dandelion. Dandelions produce a massive amount of pollen and are very important to insects. They are especially popular with Honey Bees. Here is one of the first I’ve seen this year.

One of our most important wild flowers, the dandelion. They seem almost as bright as the sun.
One of our most important wild flowers, the dandelion. They seem almost as bright as the sun.

Finally, here’s something much less obvious to look for. The drab little bird below is a Chaffinch, and you might think it’s a female, but if you look closely you will see it is tinged at the edges with the the bright colours of an adult male. This little bird is a young male and in the next few months will wear the sky blue and salmon pink of an adult. He might even breed this year. It’s highly likely. He has a lot of living ahead of him.

A young male chaffinch currently living the solitary existence of a bachelor, but soon he will have bredding colours and a chance of finding a mate.
A young male chaffinch currently living the solitary existence of a bachelor, but soon he will have breeding colours and a chance of finding a mate.

 

Definitely a Very Early Spring in Wicklow

Although much of Ireland has been covered in snow, eastern Wicklow has largely escaped despite heavy frosts, but it seems spring has definitely decided to make its presence felt. A neighbour of mine told me he had not only got spring plants above ground, but they had already begun flowering, I took these photos yesterday, January 13, in daytime temperatures of 4 degrees Celsius (roughly 40 degrees Fahrenheit).

A beautiful, abeit cultivated variety of Snowdroblooming yesterday.
A beautiful, abeit cultivated variety of Snowdroblooming yesterday.
A beautiful daffodil, clearly an early variety, but daffodils are well above ground all across Wicklow.
A beautiful daffodil, clearly an early variety, but daffodils are well above ground all across Wicklow. According to my neighbour this and other daffodils in his garden have been blooming since mid-December.
A small primrose with a delicate yellow bloom in my neighbour's garden. Incredibly I'm finding wild primroses starting to bloom around the Wicklow landscape.
A small primrose with a delicate yellow bloom in my neighbour’s garden. Incredibly I’m finding wild primroses starting to bloom around the Wicklow landscape.

 

Spring Flowers

We have some April showers at the moment, but since the Equinox on the 21 March the days have been pretty nice and warming up well. Spring moves from the ground upwards into the canopies of the trees, so that the undergrowth blooms earliest and then the insects begin appearing, feeding on the nectar and pollen that is available.

The Early Dog Violet - Viola reichbachiana - one of the earliest flowering spring plants.
The Early Dog Violet – Viola reichbachiana – one of the earliest flowering spring plants in Wicklow.
Primroses - Primula vulgaris - blooming. These are among the most hardy spring flowers, sometimes blooming beneath snow. There was no snow this year, thankfully.
Primroses – Primula vulgaris – blooming. These are among the most hardy spring flowers, sometimes blooming beneath snow. There was no snow this year, thankfully.

Keep an eye out on the flowers for the insects, especially different species of bees. Spring is the time of the Mining Bees, and there are a number of different species, but the most commonly seen in Wicklow is probably the Mining Bee –¬†Andrena haemorrhoa.

A female Andrena haemorrhoa Mining Bee feeding on Lesser Celandine, one of the most beautiful spring flowers, which will continue to flower well into Autumn.
A female Andrena haemorrhoa Mining Bee feeding on Lesser Celandine, one of the most beautiful spring flowers, which will continue to flower well into Autumn. She collects pollen on special hairs on her rear legs, which gives them a yellow colour.

At this time of year the larger trees and bushes begin to blossom and their fragrances are now beginning to fill the air, and they contribute very much to the distinctive fragrance of the spring air. One of the most impressive of these bushes is the Flowering Currant –¬†Ribes sanguineum¬†– which is found throughout Wicklow in lowland areas and has beautiful flowing tresses of pink flowers.

Flowering Currant as you will see it at the moment along hedgerows and even riverbanks. Unfortunately I cannot reproduce the scent for you via the internet, but one day it may be possible, and that will be quite an adventure,
Flowering Currant as you will see it at the moment along hedgerows and even riverbanks. Unfortunately I cannot reproduce the scent for you via the internet, but one day it may be possible, and that will be quite an adventure.

Now that there is nectar to be had, keep an eye out for moths at the windows at night time. More and more are showing up, day-by-day, and one of the most common is the Hebrew Character – Orthosia gothica.

A Hebrew Character moth on a night time wall.
A Hebrew Character moth on a night time wall.