Tag Archives: sky

April Adventures

Spring has been a little slow to take off – I only saw my first Swallow yesterday, and we only had our first reasonably warm and sunny weather over the last three days. There might not be swallows but the sunny weather has brought out some very impressive birds, most notably Buzzards (Buteo buteo). These birds are best described as either very large hawks or small eagles and should not be confused with vultures which are a very different kind of bird. Here are two photos I got of one bird recently:

Buzzards like bright, sunny days because they can use the sun to hide their approach. Their favourite prey are rabbits, especially in spring when there are abundant young rabbits around which lack the experience of older rabbits and can be easily caught. Buzzards will also eat rats and will scavenge roadkill. The famous cry of the hawk in American western movies is the same as the cry of the Buzzard.

Because it’s April I would like to remind you to keep an eye out for Ireland’s rarest known species of solitary bee, the Tawny Mining Bee (Andrena fulva). These bees make small volcano-like burrows on lawns and the female is stunningly beautiful. They have no sting and although you might see a number of bees in one area they are not working together as a colony but living single lives. Here is a photo of a female, and the yellow on her hind legs is not the bees colour but, in fact, pollen collected on special hairs:

The male is much less handsome and harder to tell apart from the males of other mining bee species, of which there are a few in Ireland. And here is a photo of a female in her mine. They often like to watch from the entrance and will duck their heads in if they think they’ve been spotted.

The female is about the size of a small worker bumblebee, but is large as mining bees go. There is a very similar bee species which is more common and not quite so red in colour, the Common Carder Bee (Bombus pascuorum) which is more robust-looking, and I here is a photo of that species so you can tell them apart:

Common Carder Bee feeding on vinca.

If you see a Tawny Mining Bee and especially if you find nests the National Biodiversity Data Centre will want to hear from you, and they can be contacted at this website which allows you to submit records, coordinates and photographs of anything and everything in the natural world, but rare creatures especially:

www.biodiversityireland.ie

 

St. Brigid’s Day

Today is St. Brigid’s Day, the traditional start of the Celtic Spring, and it is very springlike by any standards. In the last few days I found Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis) blooming:

32595658126_55678fc77d_zOnly three days ago I found my first Crocus blooming, although I hasten to add that this is not one of the crocuses which I normally consider as the true sign spring has begun, this one being a more recent addition to the garden, but beautiful nonetheless:

32595657066_79388c7eee_zAnd today the first Daffodil in my garden began to bloom, undoubtedly due to the long-awaited arrival of spring rain:

31842590133_32dd5c06cd_z   This winter has been as dry as last winter was wet. In fact, it has been so dry that reservoirs across Ireland have been at levels normally associated with hot summers, as so little rain has fallen. But this week, fortunately, the rain has arrived and the plants and animals have been awakened by it. The night before last I spotted a big handsome Common Frog (Rana temporaria) hopping along the path in the dead of night, under a deluge of rain. It can’t be long before they start to spawn. and many probably already have:

32595656566_172dbf7a26_zAnd early in the evening, as though to mark the occasion, we had the rare sight of the Moon and the brightly-burning planet Venus promenading across the sky with the planet Mars, a small reddish dot, almost halfway between them, which is apparently quite a rare event:

From left to right: the Moon, Mars and Venus straining to shine tonight through a murky evening sky.
From left to right: the Moon, Mars and Venus straining to shine tonight through a murky evening sky.

Finally, and most exciting of all for me, I had the good luck to spot a moth resting on a wall yesterday, and it was a species I haven’t seen before, the Mottled Grey (Colostygia multistrigaria):

32595656306_d78d226308_zThis moth normally flies in February and March, mostly in March, but the good conditions seem to have brought this one out earlier than usual. However, the moth that really is the harbinger of spring, the Early Thorn, hasn’t appeared yet. I suspect I’ll find one sooner rather than later this year.

A Storm Called Barney

Only last week Ireland’s meteorological service began giving names to storm rather than just using reference numbers. The first storm was Abigail, and yesterday Wicklow got struck heavily by a storm called Barney. Trees were felled across Wicklow, and in Wicklow Town a sports hall had its roof torn off, while a GAA (Gaelic Athletic Association) building in the town of Rathnew also lost part of its roof in gusts reaching up to 129 kmph. Here is my video of the early part of the storm just as it was rolling in from the west over our clear skies and the handsome glowing crescent moon: